Some suggestions

Of course there is no such thing as 100% privacy on the Internet but you can take steps to limit your exposure.

Browser:
Any Google, MS, Apple browser is probably sending your data to who knows where. One that I think is safer is Opera. I like it because it is cross-platform meaning it runs on Windows, Linux, Android, Apple IOS. Opera has a built-in ad blocker and VPN, is "mostly" open-source and has a lot of other options/features.

Or you might want to try Tor or Brave. (find them on the net)

Search Engine:
Duckduckgo has become popular although I've used it since it was in the early stages it's well known now. There are some others.

Email:
I've had a Gmail account since they were in beta, but have not used it for a long time except that I need to keep it in order to keep my Youtube channel. I have it set to forward messages to my real email.

There are a few more secure email accounts you can set up but you can also buy a domain name, and then from your domain registrar, log in and create a forwarder (godaddy.com lets you have 100 free per domain). Forward all your email from your you@yourdomain.com to a web account such as www.zoho.com, www.runbox.com , or some other, especially if they will allow you to add an external email name/account.

The two mentioned above will let you set it up so that you can log into them and receive forwarded emails and then show the domain email (you@yourdomain.com) as the sender so for one, you will never need to change the email name you show as long as you keep your domain (about $15/year) and secondly if anyone tries to hack into you@yourdomain.com email they will get nowhere since no such email (to log into) exists. (This actually happened to me).

Other more secure providers are www.tutanota.com , www.protonmail.com, www.disroot.org , www.mailfence.com  and others...

Computer OS:
I suggest avoiding Windows and IOS (Apple). There are many good Linux distributions, all free and most pretty easy to set up even for someone not savvy. Running Linux Mint is no harder to do than to learn a Windows upgrade from one version to another.  Windows 10 especially is known to be spyware and if you read the entire EULA agreemeent (with a lawyer) you will see that you are totally giving up control of your computer and agreeing to let them collect whatever data they want for whatever purpose and modify your system without permission or notification. This also allows hackers to use their access into your computer more easily. That's a large reason why Linux does not have as much of an issue with viruses, hackers and data collection.

Phones:
Again, you're safer avoiding the "biggies" IOS, Android collect a huge amount of data and even admit to some of it. If you must use them keep location turned off unless you need it and be careful with "permissions". Keep apps to a minimum.

Right now I'd recommend Blackberry, known for their better security, many of their newer phones do not have hard keyboards and although their app store is minimal and might be closed at some point some of them can run Android apps (The Z10 or Z30 running on BB10 operating system). Their more recent phones run Android OS but are supposedly altered for better security. If missing so many apps bothers you maybe you should consider that every app you install increases your security risk. There are a lot of cases where yo do not need an app to do what you need to do (check email, banking, etc) since you can use the browser to do the same thing and create a link on your screen to the site login.

Law enforcement may be listening in with this horrible device as well whether you did anything wrong or not https://theintercept.com/2016/09/12/long-secret-stingray-manuals-detail-how-police-can-spy-on-phones/

AVOID any wireless syncing or any cloud services.

You may also consider a Librem5 phone based on Linux, not even out at this writing but maximum security. www.puri.sm

Other risks:
Frankly, the idea of self-driving cars doesn't appeal to me. I doubt that most people realize or think about the fact that with these the government or other hackers will not only be able to see where but also control where you can and can't go or disable your car.

The more of these so-called "smart devices" you use the more you open up yourself to privacy issues, is it really worth a tiny bit of convenience? Not to me.

Some will say "if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to worry about" which is a way of trying to blind youself to this problem. For those I'd suggest publishing their passwords and user names as well as removing doors or locks from their homes, cars, etc. Good luck to them... :)